Snow-Bird Hospital is a small emergency-oriented facility located in a popular ski resort in

Question: Snow-Bird Hospital is a small emergency-oriented facility located in a popular ski resort in Northern Michigan. Its new administrator, Mary Lord, decides to reorganize the hospital using the process-layout method she studied in business school. Click the icon to view the current layout of Snow-Bird’s eight departments. Click the icon to view the number of
Show transcribed image textFor the given data, we can have the Load-Distance score for each layout as follows, Formulas us…View the full answerTranscribed image text: Snow-Bird Hospital is a small emergency-oriented facility located in a popular ski resort in Northern Michigan. Its new administrator, Mary Lord, decides to reorganize the hospital using the process-layout method she studied in business school. Click the icon to view the current layout of Snow-Bird’s eight departments. Click the icon to view the number of trips by patients between departments in an average month. The only physical restriction perceived by Lord is the need to keep the entrance/initial processing room in its current location. All other departments or rooms (each of 10 feet square) can be moved if layout analysis indicates a move would be beneficial. Click the icon to view the improvement made by Lord. Is further improvement possible? If so, what is it? By allocating the spaces in the order in which the tasks are usually performed, total movement is feet (enter your response as a whole number). X – X More info Data table First, Lord analyzes records to determine the number of patient movements among departments in an average month. Her objective, Lord decides, is to lay out the departments so as to minimize the total movement (distance traveled) of patients in the hospital. She writes her objective as (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) 100 8000000 Entrance/Initial processing (1) Exam room 1 (2) 0 30 4000 5 Minimize patient movement = Σ EX, Cy. 10 20 000 Exam room 2 (3) i=1=1 X-ray (4) where X = number of patient movements per month (loads or trips) moving from department /to department/, 30 000 20 0 25 25 0 Lab test/EKG (5) Operating room (6) C₁ = distance in feet between departments i and j (which, in this case, is the equivalent of cost per load to move between departments). 0 Recovery room (7) Cast-setting room (8) Lord assumes that adjacent departments, such as entrance (now in work area A) and exam room 1 (now in work area B), have a walking distance of 10 feet. Diagonal departments are also considered adjacent and assigned a distance of 10 feet. Nonadjacent departments, such as the entrance and exam room 2 (now in area C) or the entrance and recovery room (area G) are 20 feet apart, and nonadjacent rooms, such as entrance and X-ray (area D), are 30 feet apart. (Hence, 10 feet is considered 10 units of cost, 20 feet is 20 units of cost, and 30 feet is 30 units of cost.) First, establish Snow Bird’s current layout. Then, by analyzing the current layout, compute patient movement: Total movement = 6,300 feet Lord determined that two useful changes are to switch departments 4 and 6 and to interchange departments 7 and 8. This change would result in the schematic shown the following figure. Entrance (1) Exam room 1 (2) Exam room 2 (3) Operating room (6) X-ray Lab test/EKG (5) Cast-setting room Recovery room (8) (7) Total movement = (100×10′) (80×20′) (30 × 10′) (40 × 10′) (5×10′) (10×10′) (20 × 20) (30 x 10′) (20 x 30′) (25×20′) (25×10′) = 5,500 feet Data table Area A Entrance (1) Lab test/EKG (5) Area E Area B Exam room 1 (2) Area C Exam room 2 (3) Area D X-ray Operating room Recovery room Cast-setting room (8) (6) Area H Area F Area G Print Done